January 2014

Wright: “I am so glad that we didn’t sell low on Ike”

Mets third baseman David Wright appeared Wednesday on Sirius XM’s Mad Dog Sports Radio. Here’s a partial transcript of his interview, which you can listen to in full here.

Host Adam Schein: What does Curtis Granderson bring to the table in your opinion for the Mets?”

David Wright: “New York is a difficult place to kind of prioritize and put away distractions and go out there and focus on the game and I think Curtis has done that, along with having a couple 40 home run seasons. Not too shabby. And just being around him on a personal level, he is going to make us better for what he brings into the clubhouse, especially with a lot of the Derek Jeter types from the Yankees, that he has gotten a chance to watch and the way they carry themselves and bringing that kind of quiet confidence over to Queens, I think, is going to help us out big time. The numbers speak for themselves what he does on the field but I think what he brings to the clubhouse is equally important.”

Schein: “What are the expectations for Ike Davis this year and maybe as a team leader, how do you help Ike Davis for this upcoming season?”

Wright: “You know what, I am so glad that we didn’t sell low on Ike. I think that this is a year away from him having one of the best halfs of baseball that I have ever seen. A guy that has hit 30 home runs, is a run producer. The biggest thing with Ike in my opinion is the confidence. He has had a couple of years where he has gotten off to horrific starts, he starts beating himself up, he starts spending hours in the cage trying to tamper with things that he probably shouldn’t mess with.

Follow me on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo.

Shortstop not necessarily dead for Mets’ Flores

Wilmer Flores has not played his natural position of shortstop professionally in the United States since 2011, when he was 19 years old. Despite the Mets’ clear weakness at that position, Flores’ name does not typically surface in discussions about it. And for good reason — the Mets have no immediate plans to use him there, in part because of the lack of mobility that scouts have long predicted for him.

But the notion of trying Flores at shortstop is not permanently dead. Mets general manager Sandy Alderson said this week that if Flores’ winter conditioning program pays the type of dividends the team hopes, it’s possible he could receive some reps at the position this spring.

“I don’t think we’d rule it out,” Alderson said in a telephone interview. “Why should we? I think we have to see how Spring Training plays out for him — is there going to be a spot for him in the lineup? Is there not? Is he going to be a bench player for us? Is he going to go to Las Vegas?”

Alderson pointed several times to the team-supervised conditioning program Flores attended in Michigan this winter alongside Lucas Duda, Ruben Tejada and several Mets prospects. This was the first winter of his career that Flores spent significant time focusing on his overall health rather than his baseball skills, according to the GM.

“I don’t want to place too much stock on four weeks of conditioning, but this is a guy who’s never really had the opportunity to develop himself physically the way players here in the United States do, who have a season and then an offseason,” Alderson said. “He’s never had an offseason. He’s always played. So this is a different type of offseason for him — one in which he’s been able to invest in his career. We’ll see how it pays off for him.

“I wouldn’t say [Flores to shortstop] is dead. I think that one of the things we want to see is how well he has done with his training regimen in Michigan. Before this offseason, I’m not sure he ever had any sort of structured, regimented conditioning program. The work that they have done on speed and agility and quickness, etc., may have an impact on his ability to play certain positions — including second base and conceivably even shortstop. But right now, that’s all speculation.”

Flores, who signed with the Mets as a 16-year-old international free agent in 2007, played shortstop exclusively over the first four years of his Minor League career. In 2012, he shifted to third base, before playing mostly second last year — partially an organizational response to third baseman David Wright signing an eight-year contract that runs through 2020.

Along the way, scouts have continually pegged Flores as a corner infielder, skeptical that his limited mobility would allow him to play a middle infield or corner outfield spot. But Flores held his own at second despite a nagging ankle injury, and Alderson is curious to see how he responds after two intensive fitness sessions near Ann Arbor, Mich.

“It became clear, if you watched him play last year and run the bases … that [conditioning] was an area that needed to improve,” Alderson said. “Since he’d never done any conditioning at all, you say to yourself, ‘Gee, there may be substantial opportunity for improvement. Let’s see what happens. Let’s try it.’ And that’s what we’ve done. We won’t know the benefits of that until we get down to Spring Training.”

What the Mets do know is that they are thin at shortstop, with Tejada coming off a below-replacement level season, free agent Stephen Drew a long-shot to sign and no high-ceilinged prospects on the immediate horizon. Flores, by contrast, revived his own prospect status with a breakout offensive year in 2012, carrying that wave all the way to the Majors in 2013.

“Is he definitely not a shortstop? I try not to say anybody’s definitely not something,” Alderson said. “We tried Duda [a natural first baseman] in left field. There’s no reason why we can’t try other players at positions where at first blush you’d say, ‘No, that’s not possible.’”

Follow me on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo.

Six Mets land on industry top prospect lists

Prospect season is upon us. In the wake of MLB.com’s Jonathan Mayo and Jim Callis releasing their 2014 MLB Prospect Watch last week, Baseball Prospectus and ESPN have released their own Top 100 lists. (Baseball America typically releases its Top 100 list in late February.)

Six Mets prospects appeared on at least one of those lists, with three of them — led by Noah Syndergaard and Travis d’Arnaud (below) — appearing on multiple lists. Below is a table breaking down how each prospect fared, including their average ranks. (For simplicity’s sake, I inserted a rank of 101 for lists that did not include a certain player).

darnauddugout

Name MLB.com ESPN Baseball Prospectus Average
Noah Syndergaard 11 24 11 15.3
Travis d’Arnaud 22 36 48 35.3
Dominic Smith N/A 37 N/A 79.7
Rafael Montero 85 60 N/A 82.0
Wilmer Flores N/A N/A 71 91.0
Brandon Nimmo N/A 92 N/A 98.0

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Projecting the Mets’ Opening Day roster, 1/29

With 17 days until Mets pitchers and catchers officially report to Port St. Lucie, Fla., it’s time to project the Opening Day roster for the second time. There are just a couple tweaks from the first projection, which you can find here. A couple notes:

IMG_2191

  • The following takes into account only those players under Major or Minor League contract with the Mets. We will not speculate on trades or free agent signings in this space — not that the Mets expect any more big ones, anyway.
  • For our purposes, any healthy player in big league camp will be considered in the running for a roster spot. So someone like Noah Syndergaard, who is not realistically competing for a rotation spot in Spring Training, will still be listed.
  • This list will be updated throughout the next two months based upon player acquisitions, injuries, Grapefruit League performances and comments from management.

Without further ado:

Lineup:
LF Eric Young, Jr.
2B Daniel Murphy
3B David Wright
RF Curtis Granderson
CF Chris Young
1B Ike Davis

C  Travis d’Arnaud

SS Ruben Tejada

Bench:
1B/OF Lucas Duda
OF Andrew Brown
1B/3B Josh Satin
SS/2B Omar Quintanilla
C Anthony Recker

Rotation:
LHP Jon Niese

RH
P Bartolo Colon
RHP Dillon Gee
RHP Zack Wheeler
RHP Jenrry Mejia

Bullpen:
RHP Bobby Parnell (CL)
RHP Vic Black
RHP Jeurys Familia
RHP Gonzalez Germen
RHP Carlos Torres
LHP Scott Rice
LHP Josh Edgin

Disabled list:
RHP Matt Harvey

In the running:
C Taylor Teagarden, C Juan Centeno, C Kevin Plawecki, INF Wilmer Flores, INF Zach Lutz, INF Wilfredo Tovar, INF Eric Campbell, INF Danny Muno, INF Brandon Allen, INF Anthony Seratelli, OF Juan Lagares, OF Matt den Dekker, OF Kirk Nieuwenhuis, OF Cesar Puello, OF Dustin Lawley, OF Corey Vaughn, OF Brandon Nimmo, RHP Jacob deGrom, RHP Erik Goeddel, RHP Ryan Reid, RHP Jeff Walters, RHP Chase Bradford, RHP Joel Carreno, RHP John Church, RHP Rafael Montero, RHP Miguel Socolovich, RHP Noah Syndergaard, RHP Cory Mazzoni, RHP Logan Verrett, RHP John Lannan, RHP Daisuke Matsuzaka, LHP Steven Matz, LHP Adam Kolarek, LHP Jack Leathersich.

Notes:
I’m still projecting Jenrry Mejia to make the rotation despite the presence of John Lannan and Daisuke Matsuzaka, for the simple reason that Mejia is already on the 40-man roster. That gives him an inherent edge. … I remain quite curious to see what manager Terry Collins says about the outfield competition at the start of Spring Training. I personally think it makes more sense to start Juan Lagares in center and use Eric Young, Jr. off the bench, but Collins has indicated otherwise in the past.

Follow me on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo.

Majestic reveals Mets’ new batting practice jerseys

From @MajesticOnField, official Twitter account of Majestic Athletic. The Mets will wear these jerseys every day during pregame batting practice:

majesticBP2014

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MLB to institute expanded instant replay

This just in from the owner’s meetings in Paradise Valley, Ariz.: instant replay will play a bigger role in games going forward. Here’s the detailed explanation from MLB:

The following play types will be subject to review:

  • Home run
  • Ground rule double
  • Fan interference
  • Stadium boundary calls (e.g., fielder into stands, ball into stands triggering dead ball)
  • Force play (except the fielder’s touching of second base on a double play)
  • Tag play (including steals and pickoffs)
  • Fair/foul in outfield only
  • Trap play in outfield only
  • Batter hit by pitch
  • Timing play (whether a runner scores before a third out)
  • Touching a base (requires appeal)
  • Passing runners
  • Record keeping (Ball-strike count to a batter, outs, score, and substitutions)

All other plays will not be reviewable; however, the Umpires may still convene on the field at any time to discuss the play.

INITIATION OF INSTANT REPLAY

  • Field managers may initiate replay review on one reviewable play per game by verbally indicating his intention to challenge, in a timely manner, to the Crew Chief.  Guidelines will be established to determine whether a challenge is timely.
  • The manager may request that the umpire review multiple portions of the same play, but he must specify exactly which portions of the play he is challenging.
  • If any portion of a challenged play is overturned, the manager who challenged the play will retain the ability to challenge one more play during the game.  No manager may challenge more than two plays in a game.
  • Once the manager has exhausted his ability to challenge plays during the game and after the beginning of the seventh inning, the Crew Chief may choose to invoke instant replay on any reviewable call.  In that circumstance, the Crew Chief is not obligated to invoke instant replay if requested by the manager.
  • Home run calls that are currently subject to instant replay review will continue to be reviewed at the Crew Chief’s discretion.  Managers may request that an Umpire review a home run call, but managers cannot challenge home run calls.

REVIEW PROCESS

  • Once instant replay review is invoked (either by the Manager or the Crew Chief), the Crew Chief will signal to the official scorer that the play is under review.
  • The Crew Chief and at least one other umpire will then move to a designated communication location near home plate, where they will have access to a hard-wired headset connected to the Replay Command Center in New York.
  • Major League Umpires will be staffed as Replay Officials at the Replay Command Center, located at MLB Advanced Media headquarters, for all Major League games.
  • The Replay Command Center will have direct access to video from most cameras in the ballpark in real-time, regardless of whether they are shown on the live broadcast.
  • The Replay Official will look at the video feeds and determine if there is clear and convincing evidence to overturn the call on the field.  If the Replay Official overturns a call on the field, he will also use his judgment to determine where to appropriately place runners if the play had been called correctly on the field.
  • The umpires on the field will not have a monitor to review the play and they will not leave the field at any time.
  • The Replay Official will make the ultimate determination of whether to overturn the call.
  • On-Field personnel may not argue with the decision of the Replay Official.

CLUB ACCESS TO VIDEO

  • To determine whether to challenge a play, personnel in the dugout will be permitted to communicate with a video specialist in the Clubhouse who has access to the same video that is available to Replay Officials.  This communication will occur via the dugout phone.
  • Both the home and visiting Clubs will have standardized technology to ensure each Club has equal access to all video.
  • No monitors or additional electronic equipment will be permitted in the dugout. 

SCOREBOARD REPLAYS

  • Clubs will now have the right to show replays of all close plays on its ballpark scoreboard, regardless of whether the play is reviewed.

-

Follow me on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo.

Projecting the Mets’ Opening Day roster, 1/16

With 30 days until Mets pitchers and catchers officially report to Port St. Lucie, Fla., it’s time to project the Opening Day roster for the first time. A couple notes before we begin:

traditionfield

  • The following takes into account only those players under Major or Minor League contract with the Mets. We will not speculate on trades or free agent signings in this space.
  • For our purposes, any healthy player in big league camp will be considered in the running for a roster spot. So someone like Noah Syndergaard, who is not realistically competing for a rotation spot in Spring Training, will still be listed.
  • This list will be updated throughout the next two months based upon player acquisitions, injuries, Grapefruit League performances and comments from management.

Without further ado:

Lineup:
OF Eric Young, Jr.
2B Daniel Murphy
3B David Wright
OF Curtis Granderson
OF Chris Young
1B Ike Davis

C  Travis d’Arnaud

SS Ruben Tejada

Bench:
1B Lucas Duda
OF Andrew Brown
INF Josh Satin
INF Anthony Seratelli
C Anthony Recker

Rotation:
LHPJon Niese

RH
P Bartolo Colon
RHP Dillon Gee
RHP Zack Wheeler
RHP Jenrry Mejia

Bullpen:
RHP Bobby Parnell (CL)
RHP Vic Black
RHP Jeurys Familia
RHP Gonzalez Germen
RHP Carlos Torres
LHP Scott Rice
LHP Josh Edgin

Disabled list:
RHP Matt Harvey

In the running:
C Taylor Teagarden, C Juan Centeno, C Kevin Plawecki, INF Wilmer Flores, INF Zach Lutz, INF Wilfredo Tovar, INF Eric Campbell, INF Danny Muno, INF Brandon Allen, OF Juan Lagares, OF Matt den Dekker, OF Kirk Nieuwenhuis, OF Cesar Puello, OF Dustin Lawley, OF Corey Vaughn, OF Brandon Nimmo, RHP Jacob deGrom, RHP Erik Goeddel, RHP Ryan Reid, RHP Jeff Walters, RHP Chase Bradford, RHP Joel Carreno, RHP John Church, RHP Rafael Montero, RHP Miguel Socolovich, RHP Noah Syndergaard, RHP Cory Mazzoni, RHP Logan Verrett, LHP Steven Matz, LHP Adam Kolarek, LHP Jack Leathersich.

Notes:
Three questions still exist in the lineup: whether Ike Davis will be here, whether the Mets will find an upgrade for Ruben Tejada and whether Juan Lagares will make the team. We might not know the answer to that last one for a while … The bench and fifth starter competitions should be affected greatly by January and February acquisitions … Don’t read into the bullpen at all right now. It could wind up being those seven names, or four or five could be completely different. We’ll have to wait and see … So far the Mets have invited 58 players to camp — the 57 listed above plus Jeremy Hefner, who does not qualify for the disabled list since he will not be on a big league roster.

Follow me on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo.

Poll: Who should be the Mets’ Opening Day starter?

The Mets do not plan on adding another top- or even middle-tier starter before Opening Day, so it’s worth asking the question now: who should start on March 31?


The candidates, in alphabetical order:

Bartolo Colon: No Mets pitcher enjoyed a better 2013 season than Colon, who ranked second in the American League in ERA while with the A’s. He’s the oldest, most established pitcher on this list, but he is new to the team and the clubhouse.

Dillon Gee: Consistency matters, and Gee had plenty of it in 2013. After a rocky first two months of the season, he went on a 22-start tear that included 15 quality starts and saw him give up more than four runs in an outing just twice. The run ended his season, dropping his ERA from 6.34 to 3.62.

Jon Niese: The Mets’ Opening Day starter in 2013, Niese pitched through injury for most of the first half before bouncing back closer to his previous levels. He is the homegrown veteran of the staff, having established himself before Dillon Gee, and is the only member of the rotation under long-term contract.

Zack Wheeler: Aside from Matt Harvey, who will miss the entire season due to Tommy John recovery, no Mets starter is more jaw-droppingly talented than Wheeler. But he is also young and green, with only 17 career big league starts to his credit.

Follow me on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo.

Looking at relievers? The Mets are, too.

Among the nuggets general manager Sandy Alderson dropped in a phone interview earlier this week was the fact that the Mets expect to sign a veteran reliever to a Major League deal — not a Minor League deal, as they plan to do to fill out their the rotation.

Luckily for us, the Brewers are in the same position, and MLB.com beat reporter Adam McCalvy has already come up with this comprehensive list of veteran relievers with closing experience — something important, though not necessarily essential to a Mets team still trying to figure out what Bobby Parnell can provide post-surgery.

Below is McCalvy’s list, along with his primers on each one. You may recognize many of the names, including David Aardsma, Luis Ayala, Frank Francisco, Brandon Lyon, Jon Rauch and Francisco Rodriguez:

David Aardsma (69 career saves): The 32-year-old Aardsma had a nice comeback with the Mets last season after rehabbing from July 2011 Tommy John surgery. He made 43 appearances with a 4.31 ERA. But he has not been a closer since he saved 38 games in 2009 and 31 games in 2010 for the Mariners.

Luis Ayala (19 saves): He logged nine of his saves for the Mets in 2008 and has only one save since then, but has been a steady big league reliever since bouncing between three teams in a dismal 2010. Over the past three seasons, Ayala has made 157 appearances for the Yankees, Orioles and Braves with a 2.58 ERA and a solid ground ball rate. He spent time on the disabled list last season because of an anxiety disorder and turns 36 next week, but is seeking a Major League contract.

Andrew Bailey (89 saves): Non-tendered by the Red Sox in December, Bailey is the first of the comeback candidates on this list. He made 30 appearances and logged eight saves before undergoing season-ending shoulder surgery shortly after the All-Star break, the latest of a series of medical concerns that have dogged his career. Bailey probably will not be healthy by the start of the season.

Grant Balfour (72 saves): He is the best closer left on the market and the most familiar name on this list because Balfour briefly pitched for the Brewers in 2007. The price tag is a big problem. The 36-year-old, who has posted an ERA of 2.59 or better in four straight seasons, agreed to a two-year, $15 million contract with the Orioles before Christmas, but it reportedly fell apart when Baltimore had concerns about Balfour’s shoulder. He insists he is healthy.

Rafael Betancourt (74 saves): The right-hander, 39 in April, was to undergo Tommy John surgery in September in attempt to save his career. He probably will have to wait until his age 40 season in 2015 to give it a try.

Manny Corpas (34 saves): Corpas preceded Betancourt as Rockies closer, but has not logged a save since undergoing Tommy John surgery in 2011. He pitched for the Cubs in 2012 before returning to the Rockies in 2013 for 31 appearances and a respectable 1.344 WHIP. The Rockies outrighted Corpas from the 40-man roster in October.

Octavio Dotel (109 saves): Missed most of the 2013 season with a right elbow injury. As of last check in September, Dotel was trying to avoid Tommy John surgery and planned to pitch in winter ball, but has not appeared in any box scores.

Kyle Farnsworth (54 saves): Farnsworth turns 38 on April 14 and his fastball velocity has come down a bit in the last three years, but he finished last season strong for the Pirates (one run on six hits and three walks with nine strikeouts in nine appearances) and would be available on a one-year deal. MLB Trade Rumors reported last week that six to eight clubs have some interest in Farnsworth, who saved 25 games with a 2.18 ERA for Tampa Bay in 2011.

Frank Francisco (73 saves): The former Rangers, Blue Jays and Mets closer missed most of 2013 recovering from an elbow injury. The season before, he made $5.5 million and had a 5.53 ERA.

Michael Gonzalez (56 saves): He signed with the Brewers for 2012, was well-liked by teammates and led the club with 75 appearances, but allowed a.274 average against left-handed hitters and a 1.035 opponents’ OPS after the All-Star break. The Brewers are not interested in bringing Gonzalez back.

Kevin Gregg (177 saves): Gregg signed a Minor League deal with the Cubs in April after the Dodgers released him, and eventually helped Chicago overcome Carlos Marmol’s struggles. He logged 33 saves with a 3.48 ERA in 62 games, including two saves and one blown save against the Brewers. The Brewers have been linked to Gregg before.

Joel Hanrahan (100 saves): Another rehabber. Hanrahan, traded from the Pirates to the Red Sox in December 2012, underwent Tommy John surgery in May and reportedly will throw for teams in Spring Training to try to find a job.

Brandon Lyon (79 saves): The 34-year-old right-hander has a pair of 20-save seasons on his ledger, but has been a setup man since 2010. He made 37 appearances for the Mets last season with a 4.98 ERA and was released in July. His average fastball velocity fell from 90.2 mph in 2012 to 87.8 mph in 2013, according to data from FanGraphs.com.

Ryan Madson (52 saves): A shutdown setup man turned quality closer for the Phillies, Madson has not pitched since 2011. He signed with the Reds for 2012, but needed Tommy John surgery in Spring Training, then signed with the Angels for 2013, but never made it to the mound.

Carlos Marmol (117 saves): He was all but run out of Wrigley Field, but Marmol is only 31 (of pitchers on this list, only Bailey and Corpas are younger) and could be a good fit for a Brewers team willing to take a flier. He was very close in Chicago with Brewers third baseman Aramis Ramirez, who is entering the final season of his contract with Milwaukee and is represented by the same agent, Paul Kinzer. He was still throwing a 93.7 mph average fastball in 2013, when Marmol made 52 appearances for the Cubs and Dodgers with a 4.41 ERA, including a 2.53 ERA in 21 regular season games with the Dodgers. Melvin and Kinzer met at the Winter Meetings to discuss Marmol.

Brett Myers (40 saves): A serious elbow injury limited Myers to four appearances with the Indians in 2013, but he is looking to pitch in 2014, according to reports.

Jon Rauch (62 saves): The Brewers explored signing the 6-foot-11 right-hander last winter, but he went to the Marlins and posted a 7.56 ERA in 15 games before being released in May.

Fernando Rodney (172 saves): Life is good when a 37-save, 3.38 ERA season qualifies as a “down year,” but such is life after Rodney’s remarkable 2012 campaign. The fact he is seeking a multiyear deal probably puts him out of the Brewers’ price range.

Francisco Rodriguez (304 saves): The Brewers have already acquired K-Rod twice; in a trade with the Mets the night of the 2011 All-Star Game, and via a Minor League free agent contract last April. Rodriguez made it back to Milwaukee and helped stabilize the bullpen, posting a 1.09 ERA in 25 games before Melvin dealt him to the Orioles for third base prospect Nicky Delmonico. Rodriguez, who turned 32 on Tuesday, is represented by Scott Boras. Another return is quite possible; Melvin said he’s talked to Boras about Rodriguez this winter.

Jose Valverde (286 saves): Thirty-six in March, it appears Valverde’s best days are behind him. He pitched to a 5.59 ERA in 20 appearances for the Tigers last season before the team released him in August.

Follow me on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo.

Mets COO Wilpon: Piazza “is a true Hall of Famer”

After Mike Piazza fell short in his Hall of Fame bid for the second straight year, Mets COO Jeff Wilpon released the following statement:

“On behalf of the organization and our fans, Mike is a true Hall of Famer. We proudly display his plaque in the Mets Hall of Fame, and we’re hopeful that he’ll soon have one hanging in Cooperstown.”

piazza hall of fame

Here is the full tally of voting totals, with former Mets players highlighted:

Player (Years on ballot) Total Votes Percentage
Greg Maddux (1) 555 97.2
Tom Glavine (1) 525 91.9
Frank Thomas (1) 478 83.7
Craig Biggio (2) 427 74.8
Mike Piazza (2) 355 62.2
Jack Morris (15) 351 61.5
Jeff Bagwell (4) 310 54.3
Tim Raines (7) 263 46.1
Roger Clemens (2) 202 35.4
Barry Bonds (2) 198 34.7
Lee Smith (12) 171 29.9
Curt Schilling (2) 167 29.2
Edgar Martinez (5) 144 25.2
Alan Trammell (13) 119 20.8
Mike Mussina (1) 116 20.3
Jeff Kent (1) 87 15.2
Fred McGriff (8) 67 11.7
Mark McGwire (8) 63 11.0
Larry Walker (4) 58 10.2
Don Mattingly (14) 47 8.2
Sammy Sosa (2) 41 7.2
Rafael Palmeiro (4) 25 4.4
Moises Alou (1) 6 1.1
Hideo Nomo (1) 6 1.1
Luis Gonzalez (1) 5 0.9
Eric Gagne (1) 2 0.4
J.T. Snow (1) 2 0.4
Armando Benitez (1) 1 0.2
Jacque Jones (1) 1 0.2
Kenny Rogers (1) 1 0.2
Sean Casey (1) 0 0.0
Ray Durham (1) 0 0.0
Todd Jones (1) 0 0.0
Paul Lo Duca (1) 0 0.0
Richie Sexson (1) 0 0.0
Mike Timlin (1) 0 0.0

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