Results tagged ‘ Gary Carter ’

Mets in the Hall of Fame: a larger group than you might think

Though the National Baseball Hall of Fame considers Tom Seaver the only primary Met in its annals, Seaver is far from alone in Cooperstown. Ten other Hall of Fame players wore blue and orange at some point in their careers, and when Tom Glavine (presumably) and Joe Torre take the podium this July, that number will jump to a total of 3 (not including George Weiss, an executive who was never in uniform, or Casey Stengel and Ralph Kiner, a manager and a broadcaster who only played elsewhere).

The tally:

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Yogi Berra (Class of 1972)
Obviously best-known as a Yankee, Berra played his final four games with the Mets in 1965, staying on as a coach and becoming their manager in 1972. He remained in that role for four seasons, winning the National League pennant in 1973.

Warren Spahn (Class of 1973)
Spahn won 356 games as a member of the Boston and Milwaukee Braves, joining the Mets in 1965 with his Hall of Fame resume already complete. He went 4-12 in Flushing at age 44, finishing out the year (and his career) with the Giants.

Willie Mays (Class of 1979)
A Giant not quite for life, Mays played out his final season and a half in New York from 1972-73. He hit only .238 with the Mets, mustering 14 home runs to increase his lifetime total to 660 — at the time the third-highest total in history.

Duke Snider (Class of 1980)
Legendary players wrapping up their careers in Flushing — seems to be a trend, doesn’t it? Following 16 Hall-worthy seasons with the Dodgers, Snider came to Queens in 1963 for one unremarkable season, then to San Francisco in 1964 for one last hurrah.

Tom Seaver (Class of 1992)
This is the one Hall of Famer Mets fans can truly call their own. Seaver rose to prominence with the Mets in the late 1960s, spending 11 years in Flushing before the ill-fated 1977 trade that sent him to the Reds. He made a Shea Stadium encore six years later, winning nine more games with the Mets for a total of 198.

Richie Ashburn (Class of 1995)
Twelve years with the Phillies, two with the Cubs and one final campaign with the Mets. But unlike the others on this list, Ashburn still had something to give when he arrived in Flushing at age 35, hitting .306 in his final big league season.

Nolan Ryan (Class of 1999)
Had the Mets not traded their homegrown flamethrower in 1971, he might have joined Seaver with a Mets cap in the Hall. As it was, Ryan went on to log another 5,000 innings or so with the Angels, Astros and Rangers, entering Cooperstown as a Ranger.

Gary Carter (Class of 2003)
Though Carter won his only World Series in New York and is perhaps most identifiable with the Mets, the bulk of his best seasons came in Montreal. For that reason, he became the first player to enter Cooperstown sporting an Expos cap.

Eddie Murray (Class of 2003)
An Orioles legend, Murray still had some pop in his bat when he came to the Mets in 1992. But he didn’t last long, playing only two seasons in Flushing before moving on to the Indians, Orioles, Angels and Dodgers.

Rickie Henderson (Class of 2009)
Henderson also had something left in the tank when he arrived in New York in 1999, stealing 42 bases in 152 games with the Mets. But that was a drop in the bucket compared to the 1,406 total he swiped over a 25-year career.

Roberto Alomar (Class of 2011)
All 12 of Alomar’s All-Star appearances and all 10 of his Gold Gloves came in the first 14 years of his career. He arrived in New York in Year 15, still durable at age 34 but a shadow of his former self.

Joe Torre (Class of 2014)
The Hall’s Veterans Committee elected Torre last month alongside Bobby Cox and Tony La Russa, who will join Wednesday’s inductees on the podium come July. Despite his stellar playing career for the Braves, Cardinals and Mets, Torre became far better-known for his subsequent managerial work in the Bronx.

Tom Glavine (Class of 2014?)
We’ll know in an hour whether Tom Glavine becomes a first-ballot Hall of Famer, though it’s certainly looking that way. If it happens, it will be far more because of his 17 years in Atlanta than his five in New York.

Follow me on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo.

Gary Carter’s motorcycle up for auction

Steiner Sports announced this week that it will auction off late Hall of Fame catcher Gary Carter’s Harley Davidson motorcycle for inon the Steiner Sports ”Perfect 25th Anniversary Auction.”

The online auction at steinersports.com, which also includes Don Larsen’s Perfect Game uniform and Bob Knight’s NCAA championship rings, runs through Dec. 5.

Carter’s widow Sandy donated the black bike to the Autism Project of Palm Beach County (APPBC), which will receive all proceeds.The charity’s mission is to raise money to support two specialized charter schools in Palm Beach County. C.J., the Carters’ grandson, attends Renaissance Learning Center, one of the charter schools, which serves children who are on the Autism Spectrum ages 3 to 14 years old. Twelve years ago, RLC had only five students enrolled, but enrollment has grown to 102 with a waiting list.

The 2004 V-Rod “100th Anniversary” model HD has 3,250 miles on its odometer, and is in pristine condition. Personally-owned accessories worn by Gary and Sandy will also be a part of the auction package, including leather jackets with “Kid” and “Sandy” embroidered inside, as well as helmets, boots, and gloves. The reserve has yet to be determined.

The bike was a gift to Carter from the Mets upon his induction into the Hall of Fame.

For photographs of the 100 Anniversary VRod by Harley Davidson, visit http://www.hogs4sale.com/Inventory_V_Rod.htm.

A note on Gary Carter’s memorial

Late Mets catcher Gary Carter’s family is holding a memorial for family and friends Friday evening in the Palm Beach, Fla. area. In lieu of flowers, the family has asked that donations be made to The Gary Carter Foundation, 580 Village Blvd., Suite 315, West Palm Beach, FL, 33409. Donations will go to support the Autism Project of Palm Beach County, Hospice of Palm Beach County, and Palm Beach Atlantic University Basebal.

—–Follow along on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo.

Reaction to Gary Carter’s death

The outpouring of reaction to Gary Carter’s death on Thursday was so immediate, and so overwhelming, that there was not enough room for everything on our main Mets.com stories. Here is more reaction from around the world of baseball:

Former Mets general manager Frank Cashen: “The genesis of the trade was that we wanted to add a big bat to the lineup. He did that right away, but perhaps more importantly was the way he handled our young pitchers. He was the perfect guy for so many reasons.”

Former Mets manager Davey Johnson: “Gary was a one-man scouting system. What people didn’t know was that he kept an individual book on every batter in the National League. He was the ideal catcher for our young pitching staff.”

Former Mets outfielder Darryl Strawberry:  “What he added to the team was character. His approach to the game was contagious. It spread to the rest of us. He helped each of us understand what it took to win.”

Former Mets pitcher Dwight Gooden: “I relied on Gary for everything when I was on the mound including location, what pitch to throw and when. Even when I didn’t have my best stuff, he found a way to get me through the game. He was just a warrior on the field.”

Former Mets infielder Wally Backman:  “He was like a big brother to me.  I always went to him for advice. No matter what time of day it was, he always had time for you.”

Former Mets infielder Tim Teufel:  “The baseball community has lost a Hall of Fame player and a Hall of Fame person. He was a good man and will be missed terribly.”

Former Mets teammate Mookie Wilson: “The one thing I remember about Gary was his smile. He loved life and loved to play the game of baseball.”

Mets Hall of Fame pitcher Tom Seaver: “Nobody loved the game of baseball more than Gary Carter. Nobody enjoyed playing the game of baseball more than Gary Carter. He wore his heart on his sleeve every inning he played. For a catcher to play with that intensity in every game is special.”

Mets chairman and CEO Fred Wilpon, president Saul Katz and COO Jeff Wilpon: “On behalf of everyone at the Mets, we extend our deepest and heartfelt condolences to Gary’s family — his wife Sandy, daughters Christy and Kimmy and son D.J.  His nickname ‘The Kid’ captured how Gary approached life.  He did everything with enthusiasm and with gusto on and off the field.  His smile was infectious. He guided our young pitching staff to the World Series title in 1986 and he devoted an equal amount of time and energy raising awareness for a multitude of charities and community causes.  He was a Hall of Famer in everything he did.”

Hall of Fame pitcher Bert Blyleven: “We both grew up in Southern Cal, though he was 3-to-4 years younger than I was. He was a great ballplayer and a tremendous family man, and I’ll miss him.”

Hall of Fame catcher Carlton Fisk: “We had a lot in common, from family to our profession. He endured a lot as a catcher, as did I. And making it to the Hall of Fame was over the top for Gary, as it has been for me. We knew each other for more than 30 years, he meant a lot to me. I’m crushed by his passing.”

Hall of Fame president Jeff Idelson: “When you think of the great baseball field generals, you think Gary Carter,” said Hall of Fame President Jeff Idelson. “He ran the game from behind the plate with strong leadership and passion. The Kid’s contribution to our National Pastime is big, but his heart was even bigger. We’ll always remember his caring way, ever-present smile and strong devotion to family, community and the Baseball Hall of Fame.”

Mets pitcher Jon Niese: “The one thing Gary stressed to us was team. He said individual goals were meaningless. He said the name on the front of the uniform was more important than the name on the back. That’s what I’ll take from my two years with him.”

MLBPA chief Michael Weiner: “We are saddened by the news of Gary Carter’s passing.  Gary was one of the greatest players of his generation and his enthusiasm and passion for the game will live on in the hearts and minds of those of us fortunate enough to have watched him play.  Our thoughts and prayers go out to Gary’s family, his former teammates and his legion of fans in the U.S. and Canada.”

—–Follow along on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo.

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