Results tagged ‘ Pedro Feliciano ’

Projecting the Opening Day roster, 3/26

Just one change with Pedro Feliciano officially off the roster. The only remaining competition is between Greg Burke and Jeurys Familia for the final bullpen spot.

C : John Buck
1B: Ike Davis
2B: Daniel Murphy
SS: Ruben Tejada
3B: David Wright
OF: Lucas Duda
OF: Collin Cowgill
OF: Marlon Byrd
Bench: Mike Baxter
Bench: Jordany Valdespin
Bench: Justin Turner
Bench: Omar Quintanilla
Bench: Anthony Recker

SP: Jon Niese
SP: Shaun Marcum
SP: Matt Harvey
SP: Dillon Gee
SP: Jeremy Hefner
RHP: Bobby Parnell (CL)
RHP: Brandon Lyon
RHP: Scott Atchison
RHP: LaTroy Hawkins
RHP: Greg Burke
LHP: Josh Edgin
LHP: Rob Carson

DL: Frank Francisco, Johan Santana

In the running: INF Zach Lutz, OF Kirk Nieuwenhuis, RHP Jeurys Familia.

Analysis: Lutz makes the team only if Wright or Murphy is not healed from injury. Nieuwenhuis has little shot unless one of the other five outfielders are injured, or perhaps if the Mets DL Murphy and use Valdespin at second base. Familia is still a legitimate consideration to make the team over Burke. Other than that, the roster appears set.

Follow me on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo.

Projecting the Opening Day roster, 3/12

With the first round of cuts and almost exactly half the Grapefruit League schedule in the books, some changes this week to the projected roster. Most notably, I’ve penciled in the white-hot Jordany Valdespin for the bench, displacing Kirk Nieuwenhuis.

Unlike some people, I still believe Brandon Hicks is at least on par with Omar Quintanilla for a backup infield spot. But that battle is close. I’ve also tentatively placed Pedro Feliciano back on the roster, displacing Robert Carson, who has yet to pitch a clean inning this spring.

C : John Buck
1B: Ike Davis
2B: Daniel Murphy
SS: Ruben Tejada
3B: David Wright
OF: Lucas Duda
OF: Collin Cowgill
OF: Marlon Byrd
Bench: Mike Baxter
Bench: Jordany Valdespin
Bench: Justin Turner
Bench: Brandon Hicks
Bench: Anthony Recker

SP: Jon Niese
SP: Shaun Marcum
SP: Matt Harvey
SP: Dillon Gee
SP: Jeremy Hefner
RHP: Bobby Parnell (CL)
RHP: Brandon Lyon
RHP: Scott Atchison
RHP: LaTroy Hawkins
RHP: Greg Burke
LHP: Josh Edgin
LHP: Pedro Feliciano

DL: Frank Francisco, Johan Santana

In the running: C Landon Powell, 1B Josh Satin, INF Zach Lutz, INF Brian Bixler, OF Kirk Nieuwenhuis, OF Andrew Brown, OF Matt den Dekker, RHP Jenrry Mejia, RHP Jeurys Familia, RHP Carlos Torres, LHP Aaron Laffey, LHP Robert Carson.

Follow me on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo.

Projecting the Opening Day roster, 2/26

Not much new this week, but I’ve removed Pedro Feliciano from the mix due to his cardiac issue and replaced him with Robert Carson, who is already on the 40-man roster. The result:

C : John Buck
1B: Ike Davis
2B: Daniel Murphy
SS: Ruben Tejada
3B: David Wright
OF: Lucas Duda
OF: Kirk Nieuwenhuis
OF: Marlon Byrd
Bench: Collin Cowgill
Bench: Mike Baxter
Bench: Justin Turner
Bench: Brandon Hicks
Bench: Anthony Recker

SP: Johan Santana
SP: Shaun Marcum
SP: Jon Niese
SP: Matt Harvey
SP: Dillon Gee
RP: Bobby Parnell (CL)
RP: Brandon Lyon
RP: Scott Atchison
RP: LaTroy Hawkins
RP: Josh Edgin
RP: Greg Burke
RP: Robert Carson

DL: Frank Francisco

In the running: C Landon Powell, 1B Josh Satin, INF Zach Lutz, INF Brian Bixler, INF/OF Jordany Valdespin, OF Andrew Brown, OF Matt den Dekker, RHP Jenrry Mejia, RHP Jeurys Familia, RHP Jeremy Hefner, RHP Collin McHugh, RHP Elvin Ramirez, RHP Carlos Torres, LHP Aaron Laffey, LHP Pedro Feliciano, LHP Darin Gorski.

Roster battles begin to take shape at Mets camp

Some new minutiae from manager Terry Collins’ State of the Mets press conference this afternoon:

IMG_2065

  • Lucas Duda is the starting left fielder. He won’t have to compete for the job.
  • Collins would like to carry multiple left-handers in his bullpen. Josh Edgin is close to a lock, with Pedro Feliciano, Robert Carson and Aaron Laffey all possibilities behind him.
  • Mike Baxter could lead off against right-handed pitchers. Collin Cowgill could lead off against lefties. Or Ruben Tejada could lead off against everyone. It’s all still up in the air, though it doesn’t appear that Daniel Murphy is a leadoff consideration at this point.
  • Matt Harvey will not be on any sort of innings limit. Collins expects him to approach or exceed 200 innings this season.

Follow me on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo.

Feliciano declines arbitration offer

Pedro Feliciano officially declined arbitration on Tuesday, meaning it’s unlikely he’ll be back with the Mets next season.

feliciano2.jpgUsually, these situations are not so black-and-white, cause-and-effect. In most cases, when a free agent declines arbitration from his former club, it’s just a formality that won’t prevent the player from re-signing at a later date. But Feliciano declined arbitration to seek a multi-year deal on the market, and the Mets, given their current financial situation, simply won’t be willing or able to offer one.

The Mets have finite dollars to spend on free agency this winter, perhaps as little as $5-10 million. Allotting more than half of that budget on a one-out reliever doesn’t seem prudent.

That’s not to say a return to New York is impossible. Feliciano lives in the city and enjoys it, and wouldn’t uproot his family without good reason. If he can’t find the type of contract he’s looking for elsewhere, the Mets represent a decent backup plan. But if Joaquin Benoit’s three-year, $16.5 million deal with the Tigers was any indication, the market for relief pitching will be strong this winter. Someone will pay Feliciano. And the Mets, as much as they appreciate what Feliciano has done for them over the past nine seasons, simply can’t afford to be that someone.

—–Follow along on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo.

Feliciano may be back — at a price

Moments after new general manager Sandy Alderson revealed last week that the Mets would offer arbitration to lefty reliever Pedro Feliciano, a reporter asked Alderson if he was willing to stomach the risk that Feliciano might accept.

feliciano.jpg“Apparently,” Alderson said, chuckling.

It was a nervous chuckle, because it’s a legitimate risk. If Feliciano, a Type B free agent, opts to accept arbitration — something his agent told Newsday he is considering doing — then the Mets would be forced to offer him a one-year contract at a raise from the $2.9 million he made last season. Spending close to $4 million on a lefty reliever is a luxury that some winning teams may be able to stomach, but for a rebuilding team such as the Mets, it’s simply bad business. The Mets have a finite budget this winter, with reportedly as little as $5 to $10 million to spend on the open market. Allotting more than half of it to an aging, overworked specialist may set things back a bit.

The Mets would most likely be better served if Feliciano rejected arbitration and signed elsewhere, thus netting his old team a second-round Draft pick. But Feliciano lives in New York, loves New York and wants to stay here. Doing so for guaranteed millions may sound like a pretty good deal to him. Such was the risk of offering arbitration.

Then again, lefty relievers are often in high demand come midsummer. So if Feliciano does accept arbitration, the Mets could bank on him starting out strong and building enough trade value that, if they’re lucky, could net them something more than a second-round pick. But given Feliciano’s age, salary and history of usage, that is most certainly a risk.

Feliciano’s deadline to accept or reject arbitration is this Tuesday, Nov. 30.

—–Follow along on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo.

Mets beisbol, Puerto Rican style

Despite the tremendous popularity of baseball in this US territory, only 21 Puerto Rican natives opened this season on big league rosters. The Mets employed three of them — Angel Pagan, Pedro Feliciano and Alex Cora — and recently added another in Jesus Feliciano, who may soon lose his roster spot to countryman Carlos Beltran. So it is of course fitting that the Mets — statistically the most diverse team in Major League Baseball history — are participants in the San Juan Series at Hiram Bithorn Stadium.

hiram_bithorn2.jpgPagan and Jesus Feliciano both live within a stone’s throw of San Juan, and both expected to have plenty of family and friends in the stands for all three games at Hiram Bithorn Stadium. Cora, who grew up further down the road in Caguas, said he would pay for any of his family and close friends who wanted to attend the games. This is a big deal for the native Mets, and it’s a big deal for Puerto Rico.

Even those Mets who played here before in the World Baseball Classic were struck by the gravity of wearing Mets threads in their capital city.

“I can’t imagine wearing a big league uniform,” Jesus Feliciano said last week, “and playing in front of your friends, your family and your country.”

Now, he no longer has to.

—–Follow along on Twitter @anthonydicomo.

Igarashi nearing rehab assignment

Ryota Igarashi has thrown off a mound on multiple occasions and “is getting close” to a rehab assignment, according to Mets assistant general manager John Ricco.

igarashi.JPGIgarashi, who went on the disabled list April 21 with a strained left hamstring, posted a 1.35 ERA in seven games before the injury. Inked to a two-year, $3 million contract this past offseason, Igarashi spent early April working his way into the Mets’ late-game plans.

When he returns, he will open up several options for the Mets. Assuming Igarashi falls back into a setup tandem with lefty Pedro Feliciano, his presence would free the Mets to:

  • Stop overusing Fernando Nieve in late-game situations
  • Move Jenrry Mejia to Triple-A, where he could stretch out as a starter
  • Move Hisanori Takahashi into the starting rotation in place of Oliver Perez

Don’t get too excited, though — the Mets have shown zero desire to do any of those things, and don’t appear close to doing any of them even with Igarashi in the fold. But Igarashi’s presence, assuming it comes this month, will provide the Mets’ pitching staff with a modicum of flexibility.

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